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    Reaching Perfection, Chapter 3: Path Manipulation - Ray Benefield

     

    Reaching Perfection consists of a series of short articles on Level Design, written by Ray Benefield over the course of several years. The articles were originally published on his website (www.reachingperfection.com), and are republished here on Next Level Design with permission from the author.  The subject matter is wide ranging, covering everything from Threat Zones, to Peer Review, to Cohesion, and many, many other aspects of level design.

     

    *Note:

    • These articles are a snapshot of the authors viewpoint at the time they were written, and should not be interpreted as 'truth' - take them as food for thought, and an impetus for discussion on the various topics.)
    • The website these articles were published on was focused exclusively on the Forge mode within Halo 3 and Halo: Reach, so there will be many references to Forge and these games.

     

    Missed Chapter 2? Read it here: Knowledge is Power

     

     

    Intro

    What is path manipulation, you say? Well obviously it is the way of manipulating paths. More specifically it is learning how to control a player’s movement throughout your map. While players are free to choose how they travel around a map the designer has the ability to completely influence their decisions through various techniques. Some of the more obvious  techniques being weapon placement and objective placement, but there is much more to path manipulation than just that.

     

     

    What does Path Manipulation consist of?
    What makes players move the way they do? If a player sees a Rocket Launcher are they going to head straight for it? If a player sees a bunch of explosions are they going to go near them? If a player finds an optimal sniper perch are they ever going to move? Path manipulation is a good majority of level design. Everything in level design works together to create a smooth and enjoyable gaming experience. Placing spawn points around a map is important to Path Manipulation as they decide which direction and where a player begins their journey around the map. By placing weapons on the map you encourage players to move around the map trying to gain an edge over their opponents. By adjusting lighting and color contrast you can encourage players to look towards and explore various areas of the map. By placing a turret in one spot and fusion coils in another spot you force players to work around their area of effects.

     

     

    Controlling your audience
    Why is controlling player movement so important to us? One of the main reasons is to show off the various parts of a map that we have put our time and effort into. Why build a beautiful and aesthetically pleasing room if players rarely take the time to traverse it? Another good reason is to “teach” the players about the important parts of your maps like power weapons, landmarks, and objectives. Knowledge is power, right? Designers also use path manipulation to ensure that certain parts of the map don’t get congested with combat. It ensures that players do not end up fighting in a huge chaotic mess and allows them to utilize their skills in more organized encounters. By controlling player movement we craft their experience to our liking.

     

     

    The golden rule
    The golden rule of path manipulation is to remember that players are most inclined to take the shortest path possible to their current goal until their goal changes. When learning to control player movement this must always be kept in mind. It is your job as a designer to know what persuades players to want to wander from their current goal. By default the player’s long term goal is to win the game and will first do what it takes to win the game, and as time progresses and as players explore the map they will change their short term goal to achieve that long term goal of winning the match. There are various techniques that exist all of which will be covered in extensive detail in future lessons. We build maps to offer players a particular experience. Path manipulation is just one of the many tools at our disposal that we can use to share our dreams. If we want players to circle around a map in a warthog, path manipulation allows us to give players that experience. It is not something to be taken lightly.

     

    Read Chapter 4: (to be updated)

     

     

    Follow Ray

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/RayBenefield

    Mixer: https://mixer.com/RayBenefield

     

     

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    Article Preview: In this chapter on Path Manipulation, Ray Benefield looks at determining where you want players to go, and how you encourage them to do so.


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    I remember this guy, i think he was the one that created creative force. These write ups are very amateurish, even taking into account the disclaimers at the start... which wouldn't bother me if the title wasn't "reaching perfection" 

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    We all start somewhere.  'Reaching Perfection' is a process that has to start with where you're at right now.  For nearly all of us, that means starting with the very basics.  Only once we understand those can we begin to understand and incorporate other concepts. 

     

    Our goal in publishing content is to provide value for designers at every stage of the learning process.  If there's nothing of value for you in this series, so be it.  It can still provide value for others.  We shouldn't ever assume that anyone else it at the same level of understanding we are, nor expect them to be.  We should allow each person the opportunity to learn at the level they're at, and at their own pace, and we should support that learning process.

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