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Now I've completed the game.  Final battle is kind of meh, but I definitely love this game.  I plan to take a break from gaming for a while now - have lots of other things I need to be working on that I've been putting off, but I'll probably replay this game again at some point.  I honestly am more interested in playing through this again than moving on to the second game, but we'll see...

 

So a couple of questions for you guys now. 

Thoughts on the remastered version versus the original? 

Thoughts on doing a continued second playthrough versus a fresh start?  

If I do a second playthrough and complete it, will it allow me to do a third, fourth, etc.?

 

I could see myself enjoying a continued playthrough if I were to take a completely different approach to the game.  For example, doing a playthrough with no armor or shield, and a very quick weapon - focusing on parry's (which I'm not very good at right now) and rolls.  I doubt I'd get much enjoyment from just continuing with the weapon/armor/shield/playstyle from the playthrough I just completed.  Don't think I'd enjoy doing a continuation playthrough more than once though.  I can definitely see the intrigue in doing a fresh playthrough with the knowledge gained, and aiming for a very specific/unique approach.

 

Anyway, I will probably still put together some brief thoughts on the remaining areas that I haven't commented on yet in the coming days.

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4 hours ago, a Chunk said:

Now I've completed the game.  Final battle is kind of meh, but I definitely love this game.  I plan to take a break from gaming for a while now - have lots of other things I need to be working on that I've been putting off, but I'll probably replay this game again at some point.  I honestly am more interested in playing through this again than moving on to the second game, but we'll see...

 

So a couple of questions for you guys now. 

Thoughts on the remastered version versus the original? 

Thoughts on doing a continued second playthrough versus a fresh start?  

If I do a second playthrough and complete it, will it allow me to do a third, fourth, etc.?

 

I could see myself enjoying a continued playthrough if I were to take a completely different approach to the game.  For example, doing a playthrough with no armor or shield, and a very quick weapon - focusing on parry's (which I'm not very good at right now) and rolls.  I doubt I'd get much enjoyment from just continuing with the weapon/armor/shield/playstyle from the playthrough I just completed.  Don't think I'd enjoy doing a continuation playthrough more than once though.  I can definitely see the intrigue in doing a fresh playthrough with the knowledge gained, and aiming for a very specific/unique approach.

 

Anyway, I will probably still put together some brief thoughts on the remaining areas that I haven't commented on yet in the coming days.

The final fight can be really difficult with certain builds, you should've seen Westin using havel gear ahaha fast builds and parrying makes that fight pretty easy. But then again pretty much every boss fight in dark souls ranges in difficulty based on the kind of build you're using. 

 

The remastered, arguably, looks worse that the original.   I think a lot of the atmosphere got ruined.

 

BUT you don't have to do blighttown at 8 fps so, pick your poison lol.

 

2nd playthrough are great if you want to use a weapon that you normally wouldn't get until way later in a playthrough, in that case ng+ it. 

 

Otherwise, ng+ in all dark souls will make enemies deal more damage, and you dish out less. Not great, in terms of game design, but its not that aggressive of scaling in the earlier replays. The damage dealt/taken scales more aggressively each playthrough and stops at ng+7.  If you're using a weapon that you can get earlier and want the legit DS experience I'd say make a new character.  

 

 

I'm on my 4th playthrough of DS right now, I've done 8 of DS3, started my 3rd Bloodborne this morning, 1 of Sekiro, and about 70% of DS2 before I got bored and gave up. 

 

I'm curious to see what you think of the game now that you've finished it. In my mind it's not just the best game of all time, but SIGNIFICANTLY so. I don't think there's another game in the same league, personally. But I know not everyone is that passionate it. 

 

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Wall of text incoming...

 

I have a REALLY hard time listing my favorite games, much less ranking them based on quality.  I have no idea how to rank Dark Souls against a game like Tetris (which imo is near perfect, but obviously has an entirely different scope).  And then there's the problem that I don't really play games, lmao.  I literally haven't played through a single player game in the current console generation.  I believe the most recent one I played through before this was Mass Effect 3 (yes, a game that released 8 years ago...).  

 

So...rather than saying Dark Souls is the best (which it could easily be depending upon the criteria used), I can say a little bit about what it does well.  I was actually thinking about this yesterday after completing my playthrough.  All I've heard for years is about how HARD Dark Souls is.  I've seen it first hand, watching my step son attempt to play through it, and repeatedly getting frustrated and saying "it's too hard".

 

Dark Souls is NOT HARD!  At least not in the sense that people infer the meaning of that word.  It's not unfair.  It provides all the tools necessary to get through the game EASILY.  If you die a lot (and most inevitably will when first playing the game), it's not because the game is hard, it's because YOU SUCK!  And I don't mean that as an attack at all - I mean that YOU ARE JUST BAD AT THE GAME BECAUSE YOU HAVEN'T YET LEARNED HOW IT WORKS.  Once you learn how it works, the game suddenly feels mostly predictable and easy, even when entering new areas and facing new enemies.

 

The reason Dark Souls is seen as being hard is that it doesn't explicitly TELL YOU how to play the game.  This is partially because the makers obviously recognize that in telling you how to play the game, they would be limiting your creativity in how to approach it, and robbing you of the joy of learning. 

 

And this is where Dark Souls shines.  Instead of TELLING YOU how to play the game, Dark Souls TEACHES YOU how to play the game.  It just happens to do so by punishing you every time you fail to be observant, fail to react to the 'tells' the enemies are providing, fail to approach the game differently when you die.  The game punishes dimwittedness, lack of awareness, and stubbornness.  I say this not as an attack on anyone who may have struggled with it, but as an honest observation.  I bought the Remaster over a year ago and put about an hour into it right away at that time. I spent about 30 minutes repeatedly dying to the Asylum Demon, because I was oblivious to the message that told me to not fight it right away.  And then I spent another 30 minutes not even being able to clean out the other enemies in the Asylum to get back to the boss battle. After this first hour, I felt the game was really unfair, unpredictable, and yes...too hard, and didn't touch it again for another year because of this. In retrospect, I can clearly see that I was that stubborn person who was oblivious to what the game was very clearly trying to teach me.  I was approaching it like a hack and slash game where you can just spam the attack button until all enemies are vanquished.  That is a sure path to death in this game, over and over and over again.  But as I said, it's not because the game is hard - it's because I was hard headed.  

 

What Dark Souls excels at is teaching, but it generally doesn't teach explicitly.  There are certain aspects that are explicitly taught, like how to do certain attacks, parrying, things of that nature.  However, understanding these building blocks of the game does little to help you get through the game.  This is like teaching a kid how to drive on a freeway by explaining to them that the gas pedal makes you go, the brake pedal makes you slow down/stop, and the steering wheel determines which direction you go.  You can't expect them to then be able to drive, because they probably know nothing about what the road signs mean (even though they're clear and obvious to experienced drivers), they may know nothing about the more subtle visual cues like striped versus solid lines on the road, arrows, etc.  Of course, we would never teach someone to drive in this way, because it would endanger their life, and the lives of many others. However, Dark Souls can afford to allow you to learn from death, and that's just what it does.  All of the signs and signals for safe traversal are right there in front of you.  If you die, there is a reason, and Dark Souls expects you to figure out what that reason is and learn from it.

 

Some might say that this approach of 'teaching' is not really teaching at all, because the game isn't explicitly telling you where, what, when to do things or not do them - and this is what we are accustomed to.  But here's the important thing... BY NOT TELLING YOU HOW TO PLAY THE GAME, THE DESIGNERS GIVE THE PLAYERS THE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN ON THEIR OWN.  THE JOY THAT RESULTS FROM LEARNING ON YOUR OWN PROVIDES INFINITELY MORE SATISFACTION THAN SUCCESSFULLY FOLLOWING A SET OF INSTRUCTIONS.  The feeling of learning to navigate through this world both geographically and mechanically is the ultimate reward, because you learned it on your own.

 

Dark Souls has nearly mastered the art of teaching without teaching.  It is polarizing because if a person is only looking to follow instructions, they are going to have a bad time.  This game requires you to use all of the faculties that would be needed to learn a skill in your everyday life.  You cannot just jump into a new career and successfully perform to expectations by simply following a set of instructions, or trying to mimic what others are doing without understanding why they are doing it.  Being a Chef is not HARD, but it's also not easy.  You need to experiment.  You need to learn through experience what works and doesn't work.  You build up 'competency' over time.  And ultimately performing the act of cooking food is easy for a Chef, because they've built up competency over time.  And as competency is built up, it allows for increasingly greater levels of flexibility/ingenuity/creativity, which is where the Chef receives the greatest sense of accomplishment and satisfaction.

 

This is where Dark Souls shines.  IT ALLOWS YOU THE OPPORTUNITY, AND RESULTING SATISFACTION, OF LEARNING.  It's only hard when you refuse to learn.

 

The only other game I can think of that takes a somewhat similar approach to this is ICO, which just so happens to also be one of the greatest games ever made (imo, of course).

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Well it looks like you enjoyed it so I'm glad. I think the most impressive thing is the sheer quality of the world design. You spend a pretty considerable amount of time in the Undead Burg upon starting the game and there's so many cool connecting and linking paths running through it I just love it. 

 

I know you mentioned you were done playing games for a bit. You think you'll give DS3 or Bloodborne (if you have a PS4)  a chance? 

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48 minutes ago, MultiLockOn said:

Well it looks like you enjoyed it so I'm glad. I think the most impressive thing is the sheer quality of the world design. You spend a pretty considerable amount of time in the Undead Burg upon starting the game and there's so many cool connecting and linking paths running through it I just love it. 

 

I know you mentioned you were done playing games for a bit. You think you'll give DS3 or Bloodborne (if you have a PS4)  a chance? 

 

The world design is fantastic for sure.  It boggles my mind a bit, to be honest, imagining how they intertwined each area together so effectively.  Going into it, the world/level design was what had me so intrigued.  It's every bit as good as it's made out to be.  It's not what made the real impact on me though.  I have the feeling that the game would have been almost just as enjoyable to me if they had designed each area as it's own bubble, with each only connecting through the bonfires.  I personally spent a lot of time walking from one area to another even when it wasn't necessary, so I'm not trying to downplay the value of this feat at all.  The level design, enemy design, encounter design, and so much else is done wonderfully in this game. 

 

The character design didn't do much for me honestly.  None of the characters in the world really 'grabbed' me.  I ended up losing interest in following the story lines of most of the NPC's.  The only one I was little bit intrigued by was Siegmeyer, but I apparently missed some critical steps in following his story, and wasn't able to complete it.  Most of the NPC's I honestly just ended up killing for their equipment/loot, and not feeling any remorse, or like I missed out on anything at all.  But I tend to not be that interested in game narratives at all, so I'm less likely to be invested in the characters than most. 

 

I suppose this is why the core thing of value in the game to me is how it encourages and facilitates personal growth/improvement.  I'm very much focused on personal development, and tend to see the potential for video games to facilitate this growth as being a much higher value than their ability to facilitate a persons escape from personal reality.  My focus is always on further investing in, understanding, and developing 'personal reality', and putting that in perspective relative to 'universal reality'.  Escaping from either of those, be it through television, reading, movies, etc. is something I've generally strived to eliminate from my life.  I don't demonize them by any means.  They simply don't hold much value to me.  And so I suppose it's only natural that I gravitate towards, and appreciate, all things that facilitate and support personal awareness and growth.  Which is why the learning process afforded by this game is what impacted me the most.

 

Bloodborne looks very intriguing, but I don't have a PS4 and don't plan to get one.  I saw that it may be coming to PC at some point.  With the Remaster, I obviously already have DS3, so I may play through that at some point.  I tend to get fixated on specific games that grab me though, and invest tons of time into them.  I'm still obsessed with Halo 1, Tetris, Ico, Portal, and one or two other games, and far prefer playing those over something new (this is also why I spend years iterating on the same level designs instead of moving on to new ones).  So at the moment I'm much more interested in playing through DS1 again than I am in playing one of the other games.  It's just the way my brain is wired I guess.

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That was a very interesting read @a Chunk, very cool. I haven't yet played the original DS, so your experience is giving me a(nother) very good reason to pick up a copy.

 

It makes me think back to playing Sekiro - the FromSoft formula is pretty strong in that one too, but the way that the tells are really blatantly telegraphed, with red glows/indicator lights has always bugged me. This same thing goes for that Respawn Star Wars game. The rhythm and flow of combat that you describe as being something you discover and learn in DS is not 'organic' to the experience of either of those other games, and makes them feel more like a percussion or rhythm exercise, like Parappa the Rapper or DK Bongo Beats. The effect of including visible tells is similar for the final function of gameplay, but the effect on the experience is completely different. It's less learning the nature of the enemy/world than it is an infantilized form of call and response.

 

I think this topic extends into the field of real education, too. Cool stuff.

 

 

 

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I find it really interesting how much identity and narrative can play with our emotions and how much we 'Love' something. Like i could see myself falling in love with bloodborne in the same way multi has with ds1 not JUST because I love the art direction, but because i'm completely sold on that idea of being a hunter... where as with ds1 i can see how good the art is objectively but i'm just not sold on the identity  of persevere or give up and go hollow. As cool and respectable as that is philosophically, I just end up feeling like a fool cheesing through the game and I can't let myself just enjoy existing and being absorbed in that world. Now i do think that bloodborne is far better mechanically, and is even better at tying the mechanics with the games narrative of being on the offense,  but the world design (while still good) is still miles behind ds1.  This must be why salty is so obsessed with his mil sim experiences even if the design is underwhelming because the narrative carries the experience for him, and why he can't see past maps with a more rustic narrative because it rips him out of the experience as he put it.  @MultiLockOn i asked you twice now, can you please explain why you think ds1 is the best game ever made? Is it because you fell in love with some underlining theme? Is it just because of the world design? 


1260918535_Forgemapsthumbnail.thumb.png.a0054255c7c5aba3a52c3cef60b4b815.png

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4 hours ago, icyhotspartin said:

That was a very interesting read @a Chunk, very cool. I haven't yet played the original DS, so your experience is giving me a(nother) very good reason to pick up a copy.

 

It makes me think back to playing Sekiro - the FromSoft formula is pretty strong in that one too, but the way that the tells are really blatantly telegraphed, with red glows/indicator lights has always bugged me. This same thing goes for that Respawn Star Wars game. The rhythm and flow of combat that you describe as being something you discover and learn in DS is not 'organic' to the experience of either of those other games, and makes them feel more like a percussion or rhythm exercise, like Parappa the Rapper or DK Bongo Beats. The effect of including visible tells is similar for the final function of gameplay, but the effect on the experience is completely different. It's less learning the nature of the enemy/world than it is an infantilized form of call and response.

 

I think this topic extends into the field of real education, too. Cool stuff.

 

 

 

I’ve been calling Sekiro guitar hero for a while now. It’s really the same game, but I’m matching my inputs to the visual of sword swings instead of notes flying at me lmao

 

Edit: Oh my b, an execution plays at the end of sekiro’s songs 😂

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5 hours ago, Soldat Du Christ said:

I find it really interesting how much identity and narrative can play with our emotions and how much we 'Love' something. Like i could see myself falling in love with bloodborne in the same way multi has with ds1 not JUST because I love the art direction, but because i'm completely sold on that idea of being a hunter... where as with ds1 i can see how good the art is objectively but i'm just not sold on the identity  of persevere or give up and go hollow. As cool and respectable as that is philosophically, I just end up feeling like a fool cheesing through the game and I can't let myself just enjoy existing and being absorbed in that world. Now i do think that bloodborne is far better mechanically, and is even better at tying the mechanics with the games narrative of being on the offense,  but the world design (while still good) is still miles behind ds1.  This must be why salty is so obsessed with his mil sim experiences even if the design is underwhelming because the narrative carries the experience for him, and why he can't see past maps with a more rustic narrative because it rips him out of the experience as he put it.  @MultiLockOn i asked you twice now, can you please explain why you think ds1 is the best game ever made? Is it because you fell in love with some underlining theme? Is it just because of the world design? 

Yes I meant to respond last time just not on my phone so I can give you a proper response but my computer has been down. Lemme get my laptop out later and get back to you 👌

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After Demon Ruins, I moved on to the next obvious area - Lost Izalith.  This continues the same theme as the Demon Ruins, a lava filled underground cavern.  I had a bit of a rough time here, entirely of my own doing...

 

I took the easy way out initially, avoiding the dragons/demons at the beginning.  It wasn't really intentional, but I realized after making a mad dash for the loot that they weren't paying any attention to me, so I just continued on my way.  Next was the transition from the lava area into some man made structures/ruins.  It's mostly just the Stone Demons that are found here, and even in large quantities they didn't pose much of the threat.  Where I went wrong was in the area with the collapsing floor.

maxresdefault.jpg

 

Afterward I found out that Siegmeyer should have been here to continue his story line, but as I've already mentioned I must have missed something along the way because he was not here, and I plunged down into the middle of this pit unexpectedly.  I was able to kill all of the Chaos Eater's.  I could NOT find my damn way out of this pit though, and in my frustration repeated a mistake I made earlier in my playthrough.  Rather than using a Homeward Bone to go back to the Bonfire, I intentionally jumped to my death into one of the bottomless pits down there.  I realized about 10 seconds after doing so that I could have used a Homeward Bone.  I didn't think of it at the time, but I also had about 4 Rings of Sacrifice, and could also have used one of those.  To be honest though, I wasn't too concerned.  The route back there is straight forward, with little chance of dying.  I would just go right back there, collect my souls, and use a Homeward Bone back to the Bonfire.  I respawned back at the Bonfire, headed across the lava towards safe ground, and by the time I realized I had forgotten to re-equip the Orange Charred Ring that protects from the lava, it was already too late.  FUUUUCK!  Almost 60k souls lost.  😭

 

With no other choice, I got over it and moved on.  Beat up on the Titanite Demon (I still hate these things - seem to have more problem with them than any other creatures in the game for some reason).  Found my way to the boss battle, but my Estus was pretty low from the Titanite Demon so I returned to the Bonfire to refill.  The boss was 'Bed of Chaos' - weird name for a boss...

bed_of_chaos_close_up.jpg?v=152874619586

 

Complementing the weirdness of the boss name was the weirdness of the battle.  Took me a bit to realize what I was supposed to do, but I figured out on my first attempt that I needed to attack the orange bubbles on the sides.  After getting rid of the first, I died twice trying to get to the second one because the bosses 'arms' knocked me into an abyss as the ground around it began to crumble unexpectedly.  After the second death, I realized exactly where and when the arm was coming, and managed to avoid it on the third attempt.  I eliminated the second bubble, and then moved on to the area directly under the boss.  I nearly died here also because I let my guard down after dropping onto the lower path, but managed to make it to the final area and kill the boss, which turns out to be a tiny bug, lmao.

 

Not a bad area overall.  The final battle was a bit annoying, but not too bad.  Kind of bummed that I missed out on wrapping up Siegmeyer's quest, since he's the one character I found interesting.

siegmeyer-of-catarina-large.jpg

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3 minutes ago, a Chunk said:

After Demon Ruins, I moved on to the next obvious area - Lost Izalith.  This continues the same theme as the Demon Ruins, a lava filled underground cavern.  I had a bit of a rough time here, entirely of my own doing...

 

I took the easy way out initially, avoiding the dragons/demons at the beginning.  It wasn't really intentional, but I realized after making a mad dash for the loot that they weren't paying any attention to me, so I just continued on my way.  Next was the transition from the lava area into some man made structures/ruins.  It's mostly just the Stone Demons that are found here, and even in large quantities they didn't pose much of the threat.  Where I went wrong was in the area with the collapsing floor.

maxresdefault.jpg

 

Afterward I found out that Siegmeyer should have been here to continue his story line, but as I've already mentioned I must have missed something along the way because he was not here, and I plunged down into the middle of this pit unexpectedly.  I was able to kill all of the Chaos Eater's.  I could NOT find my damn way out of this pit though, and in my frustration repeated a mistake I made earlier in my playthrough.  Rather than using a Homeward Bone to go back to the Bonfire, I intentionally jumped to my death into one of the bottomless pits down there.  I realized about 10 seconds after doing so that I could have used a Homeward Bone.  I didn't think of it at the time, but I also had about 4 Rings of Sacrifice, and could also have used one of those.  To be honest though, I wasn't too concerned.  The route back there is straight forward, with little chance of dying.  I would just go right back there, collect my souls, and use a Homeward Bone back to the Bonfire.  I respawned back at the Bonfire, headed across the lava towards safe ground, and by the time I realized I had forgotten to re-equip the Orange Charred Ring that protects from the lava, it was already too late.  FUUUUCK!  Almost 60k souls lost.  😭

 

With no other choice, I got over it and moved on.  Beat up on the Titanite Demon (I still hate these things - seem to have more problem with them than any other creatures in the game for some reason).  Found my way to the boss battle, but my Estus was pretty low from the Titanite Demon so I returned to the Bonfire to refill.  The boss was 'Bed of Chaos' - weird name for a boss...

bed_of_chaos_close_up.jpg?v=152874619586

 

Complementing the weirdness of the boss name was the weirdness of the battle.  Took me a bit to realize what I was supposed to do, but I figured out on my first attempt that I needed to attack the orange bubbles on the sides.  After getting rid of the first, I died twice trying to get to the second one because the bosses 'arms' knocked me into an abyss as the ground around it began to crumble unexpectedly.  After the second death, I realized exactly where and when the arm was coming, and managed to avoid it on the third attempt.  I eliminated the second bubble, and then moved on to the area directly under the boss.  I nearly died here also because I let my guard down after dropping onto the lower path, but managed to make it to the final area and kill the boss, which turns out to be a tiny bug, lmao.

 

Not a bad area overall.  The final battle was a bit annoying, but not too bad.  Kind of bummed that I missed out on wrapping up Siegmeyer's quest, since he's the one character I found interesting.

siegmeyer-of-catarina-large.jpg

Easily the worst fight in the game, bed of Chaos. I love those little octopus succubi dudes though. 

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12 minutes ago, MultiLockOn said:

Easily the worst fight in the game, bed of Chaos. I love those little octopus succubi dudes though. 

 

I'd put it as second worst, to Pinwheel.  I definitely can't argue with too much with calling it the worst battle, because the entire goal of the battle is to avoid the boss and attack something that doesn't even move.  Unlike the battle with Pinwheel though, you at least have to put some thought/awareness into the battle.  The most complicated part of the Pinwheel battle was realizing that he does nothing, and that you can just run right up to him and attack without concern.  They're the worst two boss battles by a wide margin.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Westin said:

I’ve been calling Sekiro guitar hero for a while now. It’s really the same game, but I’m matching my inputs to the visual of sword swings instead of notes flying at me lmao

 

Edit: Oh my b, an execution plays at the end of sekiro’s songs 😂

Interesting. I was going to use guitar hero as an analogy for the combat between the games a few days ago.

 

Sekiro is guitar hero without starpower.

 

Dark souls is guitar hero where you can just hold all the buttons down so you wont miss, with the roll as your starpower so you dont fail the hard parts.

Edited by no god anywhere

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5 minutes ago, no god anywhere said:

Interesting. I was going to use guitar hero as an analogy for the combat between the games a few days ago.

 

Sekiro is guitar hero without starpower.

 

Dark souls is guitar hero where you can just hold all the buttons down so you never miss, with the roll as your starpower so you dont fail the hard parts.

I don't understand this analogy at all. 

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, MultiLockOn said:

I don't understand this analogy at all. 

Simplified, both sekiro and DS games are just attack and defend. You react to visual cues the same as GH. Sekiro you have to be precise to hit the notes. Dark souls you can just hold your shield up or hold the note as it passes by to hit it.

 

Then when things get hot? Roll around ten times, or just activate starpower.

Edited by no god anywhere

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Posted (edited)

Manus is one of the funnest fights in Dark Souls chunk. Enjoy

 

Dark Souls 2 is the only Dark Souls game that actually gives you unique items in ng+ and it will have different items for each ng+ you do. Some stores even start carrying things that are difficult to get in the first playthrough. There are items you can use at bonfires to do this for individual areas. 

Edited by purely fat

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I challenge everyone here to do a non lock on play through of ds, you might find it to be more engaging like i do, it can change how you approach certain obstacles and changes the game quite alot. Like those knights with capes inside the first bell tower church, they can back stab you if you try running away, and since you can't lock on and simply back step attacks, or rotate around them, you are forced to fight them head on. Just try it please, at least get to the bell gargoyles

https://gamerdvr.com/gamer/soldat-duchrist/video/98820879

https://gamerdvr.com/gamer/soldat-duchrist/video/98821015

 

And i think it would be so cool if you could come back to the church tower later on in the game and fight the rest of the stone gargoyles, there is like 8 of them left, it's my favorite boss fight in the game possibly 


1260918535_Forgemapsthumbnail.thumb.png.a0054255c7c5aba3a52c3cef60b4b815.png

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36 minutes ago, Soldat Du Christ said:

I challenge everyone here to do a non lock on play through of ds, you might find it to be more engaging like i do, it can change how you approach certain obstacles and changes the game quite alot. Like those knights with capes inside the first bell tower church, they can back stab you if you try running away, and since you can't lock on and simply back step attacks, or rotate around them, you are forced to fight them head on. Just try it please, at least get to the bell gargoyles

https://gamerdvr.com/gamer/soldat-duchrist/video/98820879

https://gamerdvr.com/gamer/soldat-duchrist/video/98821015

 

And i think it would be so cool if you could come back to the church tower later on in the game and fight the rest of the stone gargoyles, there is like 8 of them left, it's my favorite boss fight in the game possibly 

It is actually how I play in general. I only use the lock for camera corrections because I play max sense in it. But I play to roll through everything and 180 strike people with clubs. Also it is incredibly useful in pvp because you can essentially bait people into thinking it is clear to attack you just for you to aim at them in the last second and pancake their ass.

 

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On my third playthrough right now.  I just need to go through the Tomb of the Giants, and the DLC.  I just beat Seath.  I got cursed by him twice, after never having that problem before.  I figured out my mistake, and shouldn't have that problem again in the future.

 

I'm enjoying still learning and improving as I go along.

@Soldat Du Christ I enjoyed that video, and can see myself maybe enjoying needing to learn a different skillset after playing through the Dark Souls series dozens of times.  I could see myself still enjoying this game for several years without losing that sense of accomplishment he's referring to though.

 

I have to say that contrary to most opinions I've seen, Ash Lake does absolutely nothing for me.  I feel like it adds virtually nothing to the game from a gameplay standpoint.  Maybe a little bit from a story perspective.  It's just too bare, too flat, too linear for my taste.  I feel like they NEEDED to add the music (which is definitely cool) to prevent it from being obviously recognized as the bland area that it is.  I have no idea what the purpose of the area is from a developer perspective though, and I understand that not every area needs to be groundbreaking or focus on bringing new gameplay to the table.  I just happen to find the area really boring.  You spend 5 minutes walking through sand to fight like 3 enemies.

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I've completed 3 full playthroughs of Dark Souls.  Still plan to play through it several more times, but I decided to give the other games a try.

 

I got an hour into Dark Souls 2 and couldn't handle it anymore.  The control feels so janky.  It's nearly flawless in the original, and somehow they managed to mess it up in the second?  Weird.  I may come back to it at some point in the future, but I can't see myself ever enjoying it.  It reminds me of how Halo 3 felt to me when I played it originally, and I still can't stand it.

 

I moved on to the third game.  I'm only about an hour into it, but am enjoying it quite a bit so far.  I just made my way through Firelink, and started on the area you warp to after that which I can't remember the name of.  I'll try to share some updates as I go along.

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