Kantalope

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Kantalope last won the day on September 1

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About Kantalope

  • Birthday 12/18/1997

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  1. There should be some interesting variants of the hammer/anvil for design challenges and potential competitions if that concept is part of the finalized logo. I've been sketching some ideas and am really liking how they could look once I get the hang of Photoshop; I've been using Krita and don't want to mess with it's core quirks (it's so damn hard to edit the pen smoothing, and might not even work with my current drawing tablet). This is a good time to ask: What kind of competitions would y'all be interested in participating in? Some ideas that we've come up with include annual game jams, level design for an existing game, and community-involved game development.
  2. This logo by @no god anywhere is still the best one so far: But the OG Hammer/Anvil one is far more versatile because of how much you can play with it for special events or competitions.
  3. TBH I like how the very top right one looks. There's no need for any outlines, just clean shapes with well defined contours. I'd vote for that one in a poll edit: I like how the D for Design sorta provides a foundation. It feels more sound than the one Chunk reminded everyone of because of this, and the arrows uwu
  4. Welcome to the November Design Challenge! This month we'll be looking to a more traditional genre of gaming: card games. Card games aren't just about collecting and battling if not for kids; there are single deck versus games like Exploding Kittens and Munchkins, deck building versus games like Magic the Gathering and the base game for Red Tavern Inn, and even cooperative games like Dresden Files and Mysterium. There's even more that can be done when this genre is translated to the medium of videogames; Slay the Spire and Dicey Dungeon are great examples of games that aren't entirely impossible on the tabletop, but, with the aid of AI and algorithms, enable easy ways of placing cards into rogue-like and mission based structures. Also, making an up-to-date digital version of a tabletop game allows people to come together to experience it both face-to-face, state-to-state, and nation-to-nation. There's plenty of potential with this genre, so go out there and realize it! For this challenge, design a card game, tabletop and/or digital. Sounds like a pretty simple base objective, but the game can be as complex as necessary. A major difference from between this challenge and most others planned is that this primarily a sandbox design challenge rather than a level design one . One can take approaches to certain aspects of a game and turn it around, forcing the player to think differently. Don't be afraid to change the game significantly if either emergent elements that aren't too prevalent are more interesting to the core loop or if that core loop isn't entirely that interesting in practice. Look up the variety of games to be inspired by or even deep dive into the building blocks of card games to create something truly unique! Be open to submitting early, even when the game is just a concept, that way other forum members can provide feedback from the start. Who knows, this new concept may develop into a feasible product. Only three guidelines apply to this challenge: The game or concept must be designed around cards and how they manifest in gaming The game or concept must be posted on the November Challenge: Building a Gathering Submission Thread The post must include at least one picture/sketch of the game or concept If you're not registered on the site, it's an easy process. Here's a link to where you can do so: (link) The submission thread will remain open until November 30th. There is no limit to the number of levels you can submit. Submit one and go into as much detail about it as possible, or submit many with the bare minimum of detail. Take Whichever route you feel will be the most beneficial to your own development. A couple of details that could be included in the post as a way to better convey the design process are: The kind of sandbox that is being designed Multiple Pictures, and/or video footage of the game An overview of how to set up the game A flow diagram of an example playthrough An explanation of the source of inspiration for the game Anything that helps convey the thought process behind the game Here's a link to the Submission and Discussion thread for this Challenge:(link) These challenges have helped me understand more about myself: I don't know how players will react to or interact with my environments because I don't play them enough. I'm always theorizing and trying new things without actually bringing them into fruition. This challenge is where I decided to improve myself not only as a designer but also as a person: I will not only think and plan, but I will also do. But first I had to the usual: plan, which was thankfully quick. In only a few days I had come up with the idea of an elimination card game centered around having two health pools: a hand to play from and a stash. The stash is sort of a personal, self-curated deck that certain cards pulled from, meaning that the player was responsible for determining their arsenal. Unfortunately only one card this ability, and it only took the cards that it placed there in the first place. Well, that's problematic. Only two other cards referenced the stash: one placed itself and an additional card from the graveyard into the player's stash while the other dealt the same amount of damaged to another player as sacrificed by the player using said card. This whole conundrum went under my radar until the first playtest. Here's a look at one of the cards: I bought blank playing cards online and some fine tip sharpies to make a physical game to physically playtest, a process a lot more direct than building it on my computer. The cards are crudely drawn, yet still playable. Scratch that, the wording on many of the cards were convoluted; I had written it the night before after a double shift at work, so I hadn't taken the time to simplify and establish a nomenclature. Because of this, the first playtest had everyone barely understand what each card meant. I decided that that could be fixed at another time, changed one of the cards to a base rule, and established some rules: players draw the top two cards of their stash each turn players can only play one card per turn players can place any cards from their hand into the graveyard to draw an equal amount from the deck eliminating a player allows you to add half of that player's stash to one's hand or to damage another player for the same amount (this was the card changed to a rule) With these rule changes and the knowledge of what each card does at least at a base level, the next game had deeper strategy and more interesting gameplay. Now the cards that added to the player's stash, especially those of which allowed the player to choose which cards to add, had a ton more value in the game due to the draw two rule involving the stash. This is what mad the gameplay's intended identity possible. Now I have a unique game that I want to finish, so there's much more work to do. The next step was to create a nomenclature and symbol for each type of action (e.g. attack, deflect, sacrifice, etc.) so that the game is quicker to play and to improve both understanding and the pace of the game. In addition, the frustation of having a few cards and their duplicates take up most of the deck made more powerful cards essentially game enders due to their effective counters also having a lower frequency. This caused me to make the frequency of each card the same: 5 of each card, 18 different cards in total. Here's the finalized rules: 3-6 player count 10 cards in hand + 5 cards in stash players can draw up to 2 cards from their stash on their turn starting after the first round all halving effects round up And a look at the new version of the cards: The first two playtests that I had with the new deck were successful, but a third playtest gave light to one issue: defensive cards are oppressive and slow down the game when attack cards are infrequent. One game I played just today ended up being a boring dwindling match where any attack that was present was either completely negated with a single card then picked right back up with another. No damage was going through with how easily the stash replenished a player's hand, so something had to be done to prevent this unending tankiness in the endgame. It doesn't help that eliminating players in the early game allowed one to tank up with half of that player's stash. A few ideas came to mind when brainstorming: limit stash size to 10 cards - any carryover instead damages that player reduce any damage negating effects (block -> 1/4 dmg rounded up) (1/2 dmg to stash -> 2x dmg to stash) This should help give attacks more value and impact on the flow of the game. Another aspect of the game that slows it down is the remaining redundancy, even seen in the card demonstrated. The card should be less 'wordy,' and a good rewrite would be "deal 2 damage to another player's hand" rather than it's current wording, "pick a target, take 2 cards from their hand and place them in the graveyard". The word 'damage' already implies discarding to the graveyard under the recently established nomenclature. It's pretty silly that this went over my head. I'm not done with this game as I want to see this to fruition. There's wording, nomenclature, further defining the rules, and establishing a unified aesthetic. I'll be posting updates to this in the submission thread. If you'd like to suggest some changes and/or improvements for subsequent challenges, feel free to do so in our Challenge Feedback thread here: (link)
  5. My main issue with the definition that you present @icyhotspartin is that philosophy is a way of interpreting information gathered, not a method of gathering information. Yes, one's philosophy for sure greatly effects their interpretation of new information, and it may very well influence the method of which they gain that new information, but it is not how that information is gathered. Philosophy is an influence of action, maybe a determiner of method, not that action or method. I definitely agree that when designing a game one needs to not just copy trends or aspects of other games but to determine if those are necessary for the core idea of the game. How does a certain action or item effect a player's actions? Is it because of the connotations carried from other games, media, or real life, or is it because of how the game directly teaches the player to use them? Maybe it's the surrounding systems that are effecting the value of said action or item? There is a core thought process necessary to building all genres of games because they're all games played by humans. Of course both of those rhetorical questions are answered with, "yes, yes, and yes," so those aren't necessarily philosophies but truths of game design. Fuck it, they're truths of life. Games are simulations, no matter how crude, and will most certainly be viewed through a real life's logical lens. The reason that philosophy is ingrained into these truths is because it is holistic. If you want a player to do something, you need to use the truths in psychology and sociology to encourage that something to happen. This is why I agree with @Xzamplez when it comes to philosophy within this argument. There is a shared set of truths that are present in each design philosophy, so that means using a different design philosophy isn't changing a set of core principles. It's just that those principles are aspects of the method, not the interpretation. p.s. I didn't read anything before the last four posts ._.
  6. Welcome to the November Challenge Submission and Discussion Thread! As stated in the announcement thread, each submission must include at least 1 image of the design. You should consider including a name that you would like attached to your level (real name or alias). A couple of details that could be included in the level post as a way to better convey the design process are: The kind of sandbox that is being designed Multiple Pictures, and/or video footage of the game An overview of how to set up the game A flow diagram of an example playthrough An explanation of the source of inspiration for the game Anything that helps convey the thought process behind the game Here's an example post in the Spoiler:
  7. Welcome all to the spooky thrills of the October design challenge! Will you test your fate in the bowels of an insane asylum? Escape a mad man on the loose? Take on a cult of God fearing abominations? Maybe even run from a more everyday horror? Then set your players off on the thrill ride of their lives! So what's the challenge? Sticking with the themes of Halloween, design a scenario and level that enforces any chosen feeling of horror, the more the not-so-merrier. The player could be chased or on a desperate chase, under a looming threat, or any other thing that you can imagine. Be creative with how you torture your player! Don't get too caught up in the excitement, though; you gotta explain why you chose to do what you did. Since this is also Inktober and Blocktober, feel free to share some sketches and block outs of any horror related concepts and designs. It would be great to see what existing horror designs and concepts you all have already come up with, too! Guidelines: Only three guidelines apply to this challenge: The level should be designed to instill feelings of horror and the like The level needs to be posted on the October Challenge: The Thrill of Horror Submission Thread The post needs to include at least one picture of the design If you're not registered on the site, it's an easy process. Here's a link to where you can do so: [link] The submission thread will remain open until October 28th. There is no limit to the number of levels and designs you can submit. Submit one and go into as much detail about it as possible, or submit many with the bare minimum of detail. Take Whichever route you feel will be the most beneficial to your own development. A couple of details that could be included in the level post as a way to better convey the design process are: The sandbox of which the level is designed for (No weapons, limited weapons/precision necessary, specialized tools, small arsenal, etc.) Multiple pictures and/or video footage of the level An overview of the layout A flow diagram of the map An explanation of the source of inspiration for the level Anything that helps convey the thought process behind the level Here's a link to the Submission thread for this Challenge:[link] An Example: In a D&D game that I had been DMing, there were almost exclusively fighters, a bard, and a rogue. Not that creative, but this gave them almost no ability to deal with magic (mind you they were only level 3 at this point), and they always wanted to pick fights. This gave me an idea for a location; a tavern that appeared to have only large barbarians and a few wanderers that were clearly unaware of the tavern's reputation. This tavern was in a holy town, so this should have set off some red flags already. Basically these barbarians were bait for the fighters so that they would all stand in one general area, then *whoosh* the floor opens, dropping them into a deep pit. If the rogue had suspected fowl play due to the tavern's location, they could've noticed this and completely ignored that section of floor. Once dropped into the pit, they'd need to roll at least a 21 (with modifiers) on an Acrobatics check to not fall to the bottom, becoming unconscious. If anyone rolled high enough, they'd be clinging to the sides of the contraption, and the tavern owner would take notice, beginning to fire eldritch blasts at them until they lost grip. This whole opening section was most likely to be thwarted by the rogue, but I think that they were being to dark and brooding to notice what was actually going on. Once they were down their, their belongings were stripped away from them, leaving them with no special items. When they woke back up, they were in a cramped room, supposedly underground. This is where the fun begins! As they came to terms with what just happened, the door to this room slowly opens with no one on the other side, only a dark hall with a few branching paths. Much of the ground is coated with blood and maybe some guts? Maybe just normal flesh? For a majority of these paths, along with the main dark hall itself, they were littered with traps, some obvious, some not. Gotta give them a false sense of security. A few of the rooms have tools that aid the players; early on in one of the paths there's a wrench attached to an enchanted torture device, requiring one of the player characters to endure a major wound upon their hands (the obvious choice was to make sure that the rogue would be safe to continuously check everything, and keep the bard okay to make sure that they can inspire at important moments). Similar events like this occurred elsewhere; one device caused a player to be inable to walk, making traps that chase the characters extra intense. Another requires a character to use wrench to tighten a steam leak from a system so that a few doors open, but also incapacitating said character due to the amount of steam released onto them. The whole floor plan was designed to imitate the police station in Resident Evil 2 to a certain extent so that exploration would be important to the party's survival. A quick run down: - get short bow and 5 arrows, both hands injured --- shoot arrow at target down jagged hallway to turn off steam blocking off said hallway - grab wrench, leg injured, hard to ignore floor traps --- turn release valve to open all steam doors, getting severe burns in the process ----- beast released from cage - assemble lever from parts found in beast room and main hall --- place lever in wall near red door, thinking that the door opens with lever ----- boulder releases from other end of hallway, quickly approaching red door ------- boulder crashes through door, forcing characters to crawl under - shoot target near door at end of hallway to close spike pit ---------> escape Feedback: If you'd like to suggest some changes and/or improvements for subsequent challenges, feel free to do so in our Challenge Feedback thread here: [link]
  8. Welcome to the October Challenge Submission Thread! As stated in the announcement thread, each submission must include at least 1 image of the design. You should consider including a name that you would like attached to your level (real name or alias). A couple of details that could be included in the level post as a way to better convey the design process are: The sandbox of which the level is designed for (No weapons, limited weapons/precision necessary, specialized tools, small arsenal, etc.) Multiple pictures and/or video footage of the level An overview of the layout A flow diagram of the map An explanation of the source of inspiration for the level Anything that helps convey the thought process behind the level Here's an example post in the Spoiler: And with that, post away!
  9. Eh, the gungoose map was a failure anyway lmao. At least I know why it didn't work, so maybe a better map soon? Thnx for the help testing 😘
  10. You will not steal my goose idea from me! Consider this your final warning! 😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡
  11. Welcome everyone to NLD's second design challenge! There's been quite a bit of time since our previous challenge, so it's about time we hosted another. We plan on having these reoccur on a monthly basis for the foreseeable future. To reiterate, the goal of these challenges is to, well, challenge yourself to move out of your comfort zone in the effort to grow as a designer. So what's the challenge? The theme of this challenge is simple: The Duel. Any one-on-one conflict, whether it's Old West outlaws, a hot pursuit, or a civilized game of chess, it's all up for grabs! The point of this challenge is to bring into view what really makes a battle of the wits fun to play and how those aspects can be implemented creatively. To be honest this doesn't need to follow a traditional literary or cinematic trope; a provided backstory can be enough to explain a creative setting, or that could be up to the player's imagination. Who knows! Guidelines: Only three guidelines apply to this challenge: The level must be designed around a head-to-head duel The level must be posted on the September Challenge: The Duel Submission Thread The post must include at least one picture of the level If you're not registered on the site, it's an easy process. Here's a link to where you can do so: [link] The submission thread will remain open until September 23rd. There is no limit to the number of levels you can submit. Submit one and go into as much detail about it as possible, or submit many with the bare minimum of detail. Take Whichever route you feel will be the most beneficial to your own development. A couple of details that could be included in the level post as a way to better convey the design process are: The sandbox of which the level is designed for (generic CoD fps, Halo-style squad/arena hybrid shooter, doom/quake arena shooter, advanced mobility, fortnite, RTS. Number of players, etc.) Multiple Pictures, and/or video footage of the level An overview of the layout A flow diagram of the map An explanation of the source of inspiration for the level Anything that helps convey the thought process behind the level Here's a link to the Submission thread for this Challenge:[link] An Example: This map, Yama, is very loosely based on the Japanese subculture of Bōsōzoku, gangs riding heavily modified bikes in droves of up to 50 to 100 members at a time. A bit on the epic side to be considered a duel, but said counterculture has been on the decline, approaching it's end as you're reading this. Despite this, they remain a serious threat, so when the last remaining member of a gang decides to take a final stand in a quite mining town in the mountains. With roads closed off to contain the threat, one officer is sent in to sort things out. With that backstory out of the way, let's get onto the design process behind including a vehicle into a Halo 5 1v1 environment. There was a few questions to be had: What vehicles work with the bike gang setting? What vehicles could be effectively encountered by one player with a good shot? What vehicles required skill to dispatch individual foes? Are there power weapons that increase effectiveness against said vehicles without rendering the vehicle completely helpless? These questions led to choosing the gungoose as the on-map vehicle and a sniper (one-shot through weapon glitch) as the power weapon. I had already imagined the flow of the map in my head: weaving streets that coiled around buildings, waving it's way up the mountainside. Here's an overhead pic with some simple notation: One of the problems that came up while driving about the level was the cone of fire on the gungoose. The max angle of fire of the gungoose is quite limiting, and initially severely limited the verticality throughout. The only way to counteract this is to have inclines. Unfortunately the angle is hard capped due to the camera being forced under some sort of angle. This is the main reason for the driving lanes having a max 18° incline and the central power position's lower vertical position. This also plays into the on-foot exclusive pathing. It needed to enable players to catch uncounterable angles against the gungoose, and vehicle pathing needed to enable predictive movement to catch the on-foot player in the open. What mostly comes of this is that the useful weapons are in open areas that take time to get away from, and the majority of space is vehicle accessible. At least 80% of the level is streets as shared space rather than having dedicated spaces for either option, thus forcing more interaction. Unfortunately I haven't had an opportunity to test this level due to the abysmal population of Halo 5: Forge on PC, but hopefully I can get around to testing on console considering how cheap Xbox Ones are nowadays. Feedback: With our previous competition, we have learned quite a bit about how to run these challenges, but there's always room for improvement. If you'd like to suggest some changes and/or improvements for subsequent challenges, feel free to do so in our Challenge Feedback thread here: [link] .galleria, .galleria-container { height:480px !important }
  12. Welcome to the Submission Thread for the September Challenge! As stated in the announcement thread, each submission must include at least 1 image of the level. You should also include the name you'd like attached to your level (real name or alias). A couple of details that could be included in the level post as a way to better convey the design process are: The sandbox of which the level is designed for (generic CoD fps, Halo-style squad/arena hybrid shooter, doom/quake arena shooter, advanced mobility, fortnite, RTS. Number of players, etc.) Multiple Pictures, and/or video footage of the level An overview of the layout A flow diagram of the map An explanation of the source of inspiration for the level Anything that helps convey the thought process behind the level Here's an example post in the Spoiler: And with that, post away!