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Found 14 results

  1. a Chunk

    Blocktober 2020

    2020 marks the fourth October of Blocktober. During Blocktober, level designers across the world flock to Twitter to share their level blockouts with the tag #Blocktober. Launched in 2017 by Michael Barclay, Blocktober is the Level Design equivalent of Inktober. Michael wrote a summary of the first Blocktober, appropriately titled 'Blogtober' on his website, and you can read that HERE. Now that you know more about Blocktober (or...know the same amount if you already knew about it...), let's get to the point of this here article. WE WANT TO SEE YOUR BLOCKOUTS!
  2. My level design Case Study 04: Recreating «Shoot House» map from call of duty: Modern warfare Tool used: - Blocking out: Rhino v6 - Walk-through and playtest: Unreal 4.25 (Note: some probs are taken from «POLYGON- BattleRoyalePack» asset) More images: artstation.com/artwork/VgJYPR Reference: https://blog.activision.com/call-of-duty/2019-11/Modern-Warfare-Tactical-Map-Intel-Shoot-House
  3. Introduction The number of quality books on Level Design has grown by one with the release of Let’s Design: Combat – A Level Design Series by Max Pears. The book is comprised of 25 subjects organized into 3 different sections (Planning, Blockout, Iteration) over the course of 80 pages. It brings us through concepts such as Metrics, Enemies, Decision Points, Combat Fronts, Verticality, and Local Landmarks. These subjects are presented in bite sized nuggets of insight from Mr. Pears, and supported with fabulously unique graphic depictions. We recently met up with Max to pick his brain ab
  4. Small 2v2 map called «Alsaleh Factory» (My fourth try! for «Asymmetric» multiplayer level design) Modes: TDM, Skirmish (Note: Some 3D models in the level are premade Unity assets from «POLYGON») CS:GO Workshop link: https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=2153733778 See more images here: https://www.artstation.com/artwork/J9lX0a
  5. Small 3v3 map called «Double House» (My third try for «Asymmetric» multiplayer level design) Modes: TDM, Skirmish (Note: Some 3D models in the level are premade Unity assets from «POLYGON») UPDATE: Playtest video added. See more images here: https://www.artstation.com/artwork/q9ANRP
  6. My second try for «Asymmetric» multiplayer level design Small 2v2 map called «Ammo Storage 2» Mode: Skirmish (Note: All 3D models in the level are premade Unity assets from «POLYGON») See more images here: https://www.artstation.com/artwork/ZGgy8N
  7. Here's my first try for «Asymmetric» multiplayer level design Small duel [1v1] map called «Ammo Storage» Mode: Skirmish (Note: All 3D models in the level are premade Unity assets from «POLYGON») See more images here: http://artstation.com/artwork/q9Lz8N
  8. Hey everyone, it has been too long and I am sorry about that, I meant to finish up this final section of the topic last month but got distracted. Regardless, I am here now to give you my final article of the year, and thank all of you for reading my articles and wishing you all a Merry Christmas & Happy holidays. Now what could be more Jolly and Christmasy than that of how best to defeat your enemies in ranged combat. If you have not read my previous entries in the series I do recommend that you check Part 1 and Part 2 out before continuing with the final
  9. Hello all of you fantastic and wonderful people, I am BACK! I just want to say thank you all so much for the support and kind words from part 1 of my article. Great to see that many of you enjoyed it and feel like you have learnt something from it, but we can not linger in the past, instead we must look forward to the second part of what makes good level design for combat. Introduction In the first part, I discussed how important it is for you to understand your metrics, scale, weapon, etc. All this planning helps you to create great levels, now that we ha
  10. Too “blue”, throw it out, start again. My level creation process is something that is constantly being adapted and tweaked. I wanted to jot down the process I tend to use when building a new level from scratch, and this process is usually the same if it’s in a professional or personal pursuit. For the purposes of this blog, I’ll be using an example of a single player environment in a story driven action game. A few things change between third and first person, but not so much as the below process needs to be completely reconsidered. 1. The Concept Without some kind
  11. In this 6-Part Youtube series, -m0zidesigner- shares his level design process, step by step. Watch how he develops the map from the early blockout stage, breathes life into it through detail work and lighting, and then releases a polished map.Watch the entire series and you're bound to come away with something that will help you improve your own process. And even if you don't, I think you'll enjoy watching the map come alive. Contents: Part 1: Map Blockout Part 2: First Pass Static Mesh Work Part 3: Detail Work Part 4: Creating Level Collision Part 5: L
  12. The level of detail required varies greatly depending upon which stage of development a project as at. Some designers are very detail focused to begin with, and work on fleshing out the larger context of that detail over time. Others start out with very basic, high level concepts, and incorporate more detail as they go along.Regardless of what your natural inclinations may be, one thing is almost universally true - when you begin translating your ideas into a virtual space via an editor, there's great benefit to starting with a rough blockout of your play space. In this short article, Andre
  13. IntroductionThe following is a recap of an article from David Ballard that was posted on 80 Level. Follow the link at the end of this post for the full article. In this article, David walks us through his multiplayer level design process. David explains that he had originally build for co-op play. Representation of the PlayerIn order to be able to understand the players will feel and interact inside a play space, it's critical to put yourself in digital shoes. From there, you must understand and support the overa
  14. Splash Damage has released the Game Design Document for Dirty Bomb to the public. One section of this document consists of notes on the Map Designs. This section can be seen below:Map Designs: Gallery: Terminal Redux: Dome Redux: Vault: Heist: Castle: View the entire document here: https://www.splashdamage.com/news/the-design-of-dirty-bomb/
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