Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'objectives'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • DESIGN
    • PROJECTS
    • DESIGN DISCUSSION
    • TOOLS & TUTORIALS
  • OFF TOPIC
    • GAMES DISCUSSION
    • GENERAL DISCUSSION
    • SITE SUPPORT & FEEDBACK

Categories

  • Articles
  • NLD Originals
  • News
  • Projects

Blogs

  • NLD Dev Blog

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me

Found 6 results

  1. Follow Kevin YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYyLetnYnoGsib7GPDJ16BQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/KevinTillman01 Website: https://kevintillman1.wixsite.com/tillmansart Follow Next Level Design Join the Forum: http://www.nextleveldesign.org/index.php?/register/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NextLevelDesig2 Discuss on Discord: https://discord.gg/RqEy7rg
  2. This is the final part of a 2 part series from Mike Stout on Designing FPS Multiplayer Maps. Missed Part 1? Read it here: https://www.nextleveldesign.org/index.php?/content/articles/designing-fps-multiplayer-maps-part-1-mike-stout-r304/ What is not Fun in Multiplayer? Incredibly long view distances This was covered a bit in the “cover” section, but it is important to break up long views with cover. Failing to do so reduces the importance of skillful close combat and increases the importance of “fire and forget” splash weapons and long distance sniper weapons.
  3. Reaching Perfection consists of a series of short articles on Level Design, written by Ray Benefield over the course of several years. The articles were originally published on his website (www.reachingperfection.com), and are republished here on Next Level Design with permission from the author. The subject matter is wide ranging, covering everything from Threat Zones, to Peer Review, to Cohesion, and many, many other aspects of level design. *Note: These articles are a snapshot of the authors viewpoint at the time they were written, and should not be interpreted as 'truth'
  4. 'Map Design Theory' comes from the heyday of Halo 3's Forge Mode. This one holds a special place in my heart because it's one of the first articles that got me thinking seriously about level design. It covers all of the essentials of level design, and use examples to support the discussion points. This article was written exclusively with Halo 3 in mind, but is most definitely applicable to Level Design in other FPS games as well. Understanding map design can be a daunting task for anyone, but with a little perseverance and open mind it should be relatively easy to grasp. To star
  5. Hello all of you fantastic and wonderful people, I am BACK! I just want to say thank you all so much for the support and kind words from part 1 of my article. Great to see that many of you enjoyed it and feel like you have learnt something from it, but we can not linger in the past, instead we must look forward to the second part of what makes good level design for combat. Introduction In the first part, I discussed how important it is for you to understand your metrics, scale, weapon, etc. All this planning helps you to create great levels, now that we ha
  6. I’ve been constantly updating and tweaking this “bible” for years. Some of it is informed from previous games I worked on, talks, articles but mostly just experience building levels. I’m constantly learning about the world of level design, and what is detailed below may one day be outdated, irrelevant or otherwise but, for now, consider this a small compendium of terminology we use day-to-day in level design and game development. Themes Themes help define a level and give it an identity within the context of the game. A level should be comprised of a dominant theme which drives
×
×
  • Create New...